Mephedrone Continues to Be a Problem as Other Versions Appear on the Streets

Mephedrone Meow Meow addiction is related to the drug called Meow Meow, and also known as Mcat amongst other names, which initially appeared in the UK as a drug labelled as a ‘legal high’.  A derivative of a compound called cathinone and extracted from a plant called khat, it was made illegal, along with all compounds derived from cathinone. What Is Mephedrone? Chemically, mephedrone is called 4-methylcathinone, synthesised from cathinone in a laboratory. Other related compounds are also sold as illegal drugs under the same street names, including mephedrone and methylone. These are chemically different, but being in the same...

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What Impact Would Legalisation Have on Marijuana Addiction?

Canada has just introduced new legislation that completely changes the legal status of marijuana. The legislation goes far beyond the calls we often hear in the UK for decriminalisation, and actually makes it legal to sell marijuana as a product. But what impact is this likely to have on marijuana addiction? Is Marijuana Addictive? Ask many users of marijuana, also known, amongst other names, as cannabis, weed, pot, hash, and dope, and they will tell you that marijuana is not addictive, and they can stop using it anytime they like. But anecdotal and medical evidence says otherwise, and although not...

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Inhalant Addiction: What Is It?

Inhalant addiction is not something we hear about very often, but it is a serious problem, especially among young people. These substances are relatively easy to access and far cheaper than ‘conventional’ drugs. Many people do not think of these substances as drugs because they are common, everyday legal substances; nevertheless, when abused as drugs, they can be very damaging. What Are Inhalants? Inhalants are chemicals that evaporate very easily and so can be inhaled, usually through the nose, to produce a ‘high’. These chemicals enter the bloodstream very quickly, therefore getting to the brain rapidly and creating an almost...

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Bicycle Day: A Landmark For LSD

April 19th is Bicycle Day. Many people will have no idea what the significance of that is, but for some, particularly academics in the field of drug development, Bicycle Day marks an important anniversary. For those struggling with LSD addiction, however, they may wish this day had never happened. What Is Bicycle Day Then? Bicycle Day, April 19th, marks the anniversary of the first intentional ‘trip’ on LSD. Chemist Albert Hoffmann was working in the labs at Sandoz pharmaceutical company in Basel, Switzerland. He was part of a team led by Arthur Stoll, who was working on the isolation of...

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Ice Addiction: Does the UK Have a Problem?

Ice is another name for the crystal form of methamphetamine, a faster acting and more addictive version of the more commonly available drug speed (amphetamine). Ice does not appear in the news in the UK nearly as much as in other countries, Australia having a particular problem with Ice Addiction, but does that mean it is not an issue here? What Effects Does Ice Have? The effects of methamphetamine are similar to those of amphetamine but more pronounced and appear more quickly. Both drugs are stimulants and give the user feelings of increased alertness and concentration, feelings of euphoria and...

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An Explanation of GHB Addiction

GHB, or Gamma hydroxybutyrate, is a chemical produced naturally in the human body as part of the metabolic system. It acts as a central nervous system depressant, and so creates a feeling of relaxation in small doses. GHB, also known as G, Gina, or liquid ecstasy (although it has nothing chemically in common with the drug ecstasy), has become more common on the nightclub scene over the past ten years. However, much less is reported about it than other drugs, and there are many misconceptions about its use. Most reporting about GHB has been because of its use as a...

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Energy Drink Addiction – An Increasing Problem

Energy drinks are becoming increasingly popular, with increasingly more brands being added to our supermarket shelves. However, there are hidden risks involved in their consumption, and they are more addictive than most people think. Why Are Energy Drinks Addictive? Energy drinks contain high levels of caffeine as well as elevated levels of sugar. Both these substances are potentially addictive, particularly if regularly consumed in large amounts. Caffeine is incorporated into these drinks because it reduces feelings of tiredness or lethargy. It does this by blocking those receptors in the brain that are responsible for feelings of tiredness and the need...

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Ecstasy: Are Drug Dealers Targeting Our Young People?

Ecstasy (chemical name 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is in the same class of drug compounds as methamphetamine – or speed – and has some effects in common with that drug; it can cause ecstasy addiction. It was first made in 1912, intended for use in psychotherapy treatments, but became popular as a street drug in the 1980s. Historically, it was linked to dance parties and ‘raves’, where bouncy, high energy electronic dance music was played, and users felt that the drug enhanced their party experience. Now it is more common and not associated with one particular ‘scene’. What Are the Effects of Ecstasy?...

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Teenagers Gaming Addiction

So many teenagers today have access to games consoles, and many of them regularly play games for long hours; sometimes even suffering from gaming addiction. This seems normal for today’s society, but perhaps parents need to be more aware of the adverse effects that excessive gaming can have on their children. Mother of five Lesley from East Yorkshire has shared her story of how her teenage son became addicted to gaming, with his behaviour towards the rest of the family changing as a result. How Do Teens Become Addicted to Gaming? Lesley and her husband bought an Xbox for the...

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Things about Bulimia That Most People Don’t Realise

Most people have some idea of what bulimia nervosa is. Most of us are aware that it is an eating disorder, and that people with bulimia will deliberately make themselves sick. What some people may not know is that it is that the condition is actually characterised by cycles of severe restriction of food intake, followed by binges where massive amounts of food are consumed and then almost immediately purged, either by vomiting or taking large amounts of laxatives. Unlike anorexia nervosa, bulimia can go undetected for a long time as sufferers will often not show much change in body...

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