Clorazepate Withdrawal and Detox

Clorazepate is a highly potent benzodiazepine sedative, which can cause serious complications during withdrawal. Like other benzodiazepine drugs, Clorazepate is only recommended as a short-term treatment, because of its potential to be addictive. However, long-term use of this medication is very common. In order to ensure a safe and successful withdrawal process, it’s essential you seek professional withdrawal and detox treatment. Rapid Clorazepate withdrawal without medical monitoring, information or reassurance could cause psychological problems.

With medical assistance, you can undergo a gradual withdrawal treatment regime, allowing for a more positive outcome. Generally, withdrawal from benzodiazepines (or ‘benzos’) can be challenging due to severe and prolonged symptoms. Medical detox is therefore recommended to successfully break free of Clorazepate addiction and withdrawal.

While medical detox is always advisable, it isn’t enough on its own. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, detox is a necessary part of rehabilitation but is insufficient without follow-up care. After you are safely weaned off Clorazepate, or your tapering schedule has been stabilised, you’ll need appropriate addiction treatment.

What is Clorazepate Withdrawal?

Clorazepate withdrawal refers to the difficult symptoms experienced when you stop using the drug. It is not recommended you undergo Clorazepate withdrawal without medical supervision. During this phase, you can be tapered slowly off the medication. This helps you avoid some of the most harmful side effects of Clorazepate withdrawal, such as seizures. Tapering ensures your body is not thrown into benzodiazepine deprivation after it has become dependent on the substance.

Abruptly quitting Clorazepate can cause you to experience withdrawal. Some of the withdrawal symptoms that commonly occur during this period include insomnia, irritability, diarrhoea, abdominal and muscle cramps, convulsions, tremor, delirium, sweating, vomiting, nervousness and memory impairment. If you’ve been taking excessive doses of Clorazepate over a long period of time, you may experience even harsher withdrawal symptoms.

However, if you suddenly quit Clorazepate after consistently taking it at therapeutic levels for several months, your withdrawal symptoms may be relatively mild. Generally, whether you’re abusing the drug or taking it according to prescription, you should avoid abruptly quitting Clorazepate after extended therapy and follow a gradual tapering from your dosage in order to stop.

Causes of Clorazepate Withdrawal

Clorazepate (also known as Tranxene) is a benzodiazepine derivative, prescribed for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety. It may also be prescribed by medical professionals as a remedy for alcohol withdrawal. Clorazepate withdrawal is often caused when you develop a tolerance to the drug, lower the dosage or suddenly stop using it. Therefore, a sudden cessation or quick tapering of Clorazepate usage can result in severe and extremely unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. One of the

most serious potential side effects of Clorazepate withdrawal is suicide. Severe withdrawal symptoms could include delusions, self-harm, convulsions and a preoccupation with suicide. You might even experience symptoms identical to those Clorazepate was originally prescribed to treat. So much so, tension, insomnia and anxiety may return more aggressively. Sudden Clorazepate withdrawal can cause you to experience fatigue, confusion, low energy and a general feeling of hopelessness. The higher the level of Clorazepate abuse, the more intense the symptoms can be.

Prolonged exposure to this medication often leads to tolerance and physical addiction. If you quit taking Clorazepate too fast, a range of withdrawal symptoms can take hold. Without professional help, such symptoms can linger for weeks or months, as your body adjusts to the absence of Clorazepate. However, medical assistance involving tapering and other comprehensive methods can significantly eliminate the possibility of severe and uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms.

Phases of Clorazepate Withdrawal

Within a few days of quitting a long-acting benzodiazepine like Clorazepate, you could begin to experience withdrawal symptoms such as blurred vision, insomnia, memory issues, nausea, vomiting, muscle spasms, and diarrhoea. This is the acute phase of Clorazepate withdrawal, which can last as long as a few weeks to some months, depending on your tapering schedule. If you’re on a medically supervised tapering schedule, you may not experience any intense withdrawal symptoms.

Instead, your acute withdrawal phase may last for several months, with only mild symptoms evident. In some cases, you may (or may not) experience protracted withdrawal, which is the post-acute withdrawal phase. During this stage, mostly psychological symptoms continue for several months to years after you’ve stopped using Clorazepate. Generally, only a small percentage of people who suddenly quit taking benzo-type medications experience protracted withdrawal. Medical detox involving a tapering schedule supervised by professionals can mitigate issues with protracted withdrawal, as well as other related symptoms.

Clorazepate Withdrawal Symptoms: What to Expect

One critical characteristic of Clorazepate withdrawal is that it can present a wide range of side effects, some of which can be quite severe. You might have been prescribed Clorazepate as a treatment for anxiety or insomnia, and experienced symptoms such as rebound insomnia and anxiety once they had stopped taking it. You could even believe that your initial anxiety was unsuccessfully treated, and not realise that it is, in fact, one of the common symptoms of Clorazepate withdrawal.

Other common symptoms that can occur during withdrawal from Clorazepate include dehydration, nervousness, irritability, sleep disturbances, dry heaves, anxiety, tremors, headaches and muscle pain. You could enter into a state of panic with heightened blood pressure, heart rate, and an increased sensitivity to environmental triggers. You might also develop extreme anxiety, psychosis, hallucinations, delirium and seizures. During Clorazepate withdrawal, it is standard to feel very unlike yourself for several months.

The withdrawal symptoms you experience will usually depend on different individual factors, such as how long you’ve been abusing Clorazepate; in what amounts; or whether you were abusing it alongside alcohol and other drugs. If you attempt to stop taking Clorazepate without medical assistance, you could also experience protracted withdrawal – a range of psychological symptoms which can last for years after detox and treatment for abuse.

Timeline of Clorazepate Withdrawal

The half-life of a benzodiazepine can be related to when withdrawal symptoms appear. Typically, the longer the half-life, the slower acting the medication is, and the longer its window of activity. Therefore, withdrawal symptoms for drugs like Clorazepate begin much later, as it has a long half-life. At the same time, however, it’s crucial to bear in mind that there is no fixed rule for when your withdrawal symptoms will begin, following your last dose of Clorazepate – or for how long they will last. Clorazepate withdrawal may, therefore, follow this timeline:

A few hours to two days after the last dose: you may experience anxiety, loss of appetite, nausea, trouble sleeping, and the general withdrawal symptoms that occur during this period.

1 – 7 days after the last dose: insomnia, anxiety and nausea will have peaked at this time. You might start to experience psychological, emotional and physical discomfort. Medical supervision is recommended during this period because of the potential risk of seizures occurring.

Two weeks after the last dose: your symptoms are still present, although you may begin to feel better before rebound anxiety and insomnia appear at random intervals. This happens because of the presence of Clorazepate, which is taking a long time to leave your body.

15+ days after the last dose: as you continue your recovery, the acute symptoms begin to fade. Post-acute withdrawal symptoms (including depression, drug cravings and irritability) can appear during this period. Treatment should be continued to help you navigate this stage and cope with cravings and other symptoms.

What is Clorazepate Detoxification?

Clorazepate detoxification involves programmes designed to manage your physical dependence to the drug. It’s always recommended to complete detox under the close supervision of a licensed practitioner. Psychological dependence on Clorazepate can linger, even after you complete detoxification, so some form of addiction treatment is advised. During Clorazepate detoxification, the preferred method of ridding your body of drugs is via tapering.

This method gradually decreases your dosage, whilst letting your body readjust slowly to less and less Clorazepate in your system. Tapering from Clorazepate can take several weeks, and you could still experience withdrawal symptoms, though they’ll be much milder. During the tapering process, your doctor may replace Clorazepate with a different benzodiazepine that has a longer half-life, such as Valium (diazepam) to help you cope with rebound symptoms. This drug can also be used to control severe symptoms like psychosis and hallucinations that may occur during the acute withdrawal phase.

During Clorazepate detoxification, your doctor might also make use of other non-benzodiazepine medications, such as melatonin, eszopiclone (Lunesta) or over-the-counter remedies to help manage some of the symptoms which are present. If you’re using Clorazepate recreationally (especially without any medical need), you could be putting yourself at a very high risk of addiction. However, you can expel the drugs from your system and give yourself the chance of a life free from addiction, through Clorazepate detoxification.

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Clorazepate Detox Process

Quitting Clorazepate “cold-turkey” is never the answer, as this drug is accompanied by a range of dangerous withdrawal symptoms, including increased heart rate, elevated blood pressure, insomnia, memory loss, tremors, depression, psychosis and hallucinations. These symptoms are best managed via a Clorazepate detox process. At a professional detox treatment centre, your withdrawal is medically supervised. Medical professionals at the facility treat your physical and psychological safety as top priority.

The Clorazepate detox process begins with a comprehensive mental and psychological assessment by a psychiatrist. A personalised detox regime will then be recommended, based on your medical background and drug use history. In many cases, the detox process involves 24/7 monitoring of your vital signs throughout the day. The medical team will also ensure you are comfortable during the process of removing the drugs from your body, whilst reducing the effects of Clorazepate withdrawal.

The duration for Clorazepate detox generally depends on how much of the drug you’ve been taking, the length of time you’ve been taking it, in addition to your medical conditions and other personal factors, such as age and weight. The Clorazepate detox process may last several weeks, as your regular dosage is gradually reduced to allow time for your body to slowly readjust. The withdrawal symptoms experienced during this phase can be treated by medications recommended by a doctor.

Home Detox

Detoxification must be taken seriously. While the intention to rid your body of Clorazepate is a noble one, it’s not worth the risk to undertake detox on your own at home. In order to maintain your safety during detox, professional medical care is recommended. It’s crucial to stop using Clorazepate correctly because the associated symptoms of withdrawal can be potentially fatal. In addition, drug cravings can be very hard to resist when you become extremely uncomfortable and unable to handle withdrawal.

Getting professional support can make all the difference in relapse prevention and successfully completing detox. If you don’t want any medical intervention, you can undergo a natural process with professional therapeutic support in an organised residential environment. You don’t necessarily have to detox at home, as this type of “social detox” can ensure you have access to experienced help, and that you are set up with inpatient or outpatient therapy after the process is completed.

Outpatient detox is also a great alternative to a home detox; you can live at home, visit the detox centre for treatment and return each day to continue your normal routine. This option is safer than unassisted detox at home or going ‘cold turkey’. You’ll have constant check-ins to monitor your health by professionals, who can also recommend the best means of ongoing care.

Home Detox

Detoxification must be taken seriously. While the intention to rid your body of Clorazepate is a noble one, it’s not worth the risk to undertake detox on your own at home. In order to maintain your safety during detox, professional medical care is recommended. It’s crucial to stop using Clorazepate correctly because the associated symptoms of withdrawal can be potentially fatal. In addition, drug cravings can be very hard to resist when you become extremely uncomfortable and unable to handle withdrawal.

Getting professional support can make all the difference in relapse prevention and successfully completing detox. If you don’t want any medical intervention, you can undergo a natural process with professional therapeutic support in an organised residential environment. You don’t necessarily have to detox at home, as this type of ‘social detox’ can ensure you have access to experienced help, and that you are set up with inpatient or outpatient therapy after the process is completed.

Outpatient detox is also a great alternative to a home detox; you can live at home, visit the detox centre for treatment and return each day to continue your normal routine. This option is safer than unassisted detox at home or going ‘cold turkey’. You’ll have constant check-ins to monitor your health by professionals, who can also recommend the best means of ongoing care.

Medically Supervised Clorazepate Withdrawal Detox

Medically supervised Clorazepate withdrawal detox provides solutions to simplify the process of withdrawal, and help you cope with any uncomfortable symptoms. Evidence-based treatments are employed, which effectively relieves symptoms and make the process as smooth and free of complications as possible. At a medical detox centre, you are afforded an ideal environment in which to quit Clorazepate safely and comfortably. By relieving your Clorazepate withdrawal

symptoms, you can focus on fully recovering without any other distractions. Withdrawal occurs as your brain and body try to adjust and maintain balance. Medically supervised detox can help make this transition to stability an easier one. It provides the right approach and sufficient motivation to help you successfully withdraw from Clorazepate. This type of treatment ensures a slow withdrawal, which is much more beneficial. The slower the withdrawal rate, the less severe the withdrawal symptoms are.

If you’ve been battling with long-term Clorazepate addiction, you might need more intensive help with withdrawal and detox. During your medically supervised withdrawal, a slow and tapered withdrawal process is often employed, and you may also be advised to reduce your intake of coffee and soda, as caffeine can worsen benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms. Medically supervised Clorazepate withdrawal detox will focus on relieving your symptoms, after which you can enter rehab to discover the causes and solutions to the underlying problems of your addiction.

Medications Used During Clorazepate Detox

When you’re detoxing from Clorazepate, you might need medication to ease or prevent some moderate to severe symptoms that can occur. There are no specific FDA-approved medications to be used as a treatment in benzodiazepine detox. However, some are used “off-label” by psychiatrists to manage the wide range of symptoms that can appear during withdrawal. One such medication that can be applied is Clonidine, which works by lowering blood pressure. When your blood pressure is low, your blood vessels open, allowing your heart to beat more slowly. A slower heart rate can help you feel less anxious, as anxiety is generally associated with a faster heart rate.

Other medications applied during Clorazepate detox include:

  • SSRI antidepressants, which may also be used as a treatment for anxiety
  • Anticonvulsants, which can be used if you have a history of multiple seizures
  • Beta-blockers used to control physical withdrawal symptoms such as tremors
  • Ondansetron, which can be administered to treat nausea or vomiting during the
    withdrawal process
  • Pregabalin (Lyrica), which is also used as an off-label treatment for benzodiazepine withdrawal

Treatment for Withdrawal

In reality, there is no way to completely stop the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms when trying to quit a drug to which you’ve become addicted. After years of abusing Clorazepate, ‘dope sickness’ when trying to quit can discourage you from getting help for withdrawal. It’s essential to not attempt to go through withdrawal alone. The first steps in recovery are the most challenging. With the support of highly trained staff, you can be inspired to pull through and encouraged to overcome the difficulty of withdrawal, so that you can begin treatment on the right foot.

Treatment for withdrawal will vary, depending on the length of time you’ve been dealing with Clorazepate addiction. You may experience common symptoms during withdrawal such as sweating, shaking, vomiting, headaches and sensitive skin. Withdrawal treatment involves constant care and monitoring to ensure all of your needs are being met, and that you are withdrawing safely.

In certain cases, medications can be provided during withdrawal. Doctors at an inpatient or outpatient treatment centre can apply Naloxone or Buprenorphine to act as neuro-blockers to ensure your safety during this phase. For you, withdrawal may or may not require medication, which is why medical staff will first assess you to determine a stabilisation plan that is most appropriate for your specific needs on your arrival at the facility.

Treatment for Withdrawal

In reality, there is no way to completely stop the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms when trying to quit a drug to which you’ve become addicted. After years of abusing Clorazepate, ‘dope sickness’ when trying to quit can discourage you from getting help for withdrawal. It’s essential to not attempt to go through withdrawal alone. The first steps in recovery are the most challenging. With the support of highly trained staff, you can be inspired to pull through and encouraged to overcome the difficulty of withdrawal, so that you can begin treatment on the right foot.

Treatment for withdrawal will vary, depending on the length of time you’ve been dealing with Clorazepate addiction. You may experience common symptoms during withdrawal such as sweating, shaking, vomiting, headaches and sensitive skin. Withdrawal treatment involves constant care and monitoring to ensure all of your needs are being met, and that you are withdrawing safely.

In certain cases, medications can be provided during withdrawal. Doctors at an inpatient or outpatient treatment centre can apply Naloxone or Buprenorphine to act as neuro-blockers to ensure your safety during this phase. For you, withdrawal may or may not require medication, which is why medical staff will first assess you to determine a stabilisation plan that is most appropriate for your specific needs on your arrival at the facility.

  • Detox centres: these are medically supervised facilities. You may be prescribed certain medications to help you cope with the process and reduce unpleasant symptoms. Medical staff are close at hand to supervise you and prevent any potential complications.
  • Intensive outpatient rehab: you may be expected to visit for two or more days each week, for around three hours per day. Group sessions are also provided.
  • Outpatient rehab: could consist of weekly individual or group psychotherapy, designed to treat substance abuse problems.
  • Inpatient or residential rehab: usually provides detox as the first step to addiction treatment. Rehabilitation centres typically comprise individual/group therapy and 12-step meetings. Treatment can last one month or more.
  • Extended residential programmes (including halfway homes or sober living houses): These provide continued supervision, whilst you engage in other productive activities and become more confident during recovery.

Drug treatment for withdrawal

Withdrawal treatment begins with the help of professionals. Struggling with addiction can be challenging and it’s inadvisable to attempt to undergo withdrawal alone at home. Withdrawal is usually accompanied by difficult symptoms; the fear of them appearing can even discourage you from going through with the process.

While it’s possible to gradually reduce your dosage until you can safely stop taking Clorazepate, pharmacological treatment for withdrawal may be a more effective approach. During medical detox, physicians could prescribe certain medications to help relieve symptoms of withdrawal.

One such medication is flumazenil. This drug acts by blocking the effects of benzos and can also help you cope with withdrawal symptoms, as it attaches to the same pleasure centres in the brain targeted by benzodiazepines. While flumazenil is mainly used in the treatment of benzodiazepine overdose, it’s also successfully reduced the withdrawal symptoms caused by the presence of long-acting benzos in the body.

Drug treatment for withdrawal

Withdrawal treatment begins with the help of professionals. Struggling with addiction can be challenging and it’s inadvisable to attempt to undergo withdrawal alone at home. Withdrawal is usually accompanied by difficult symptoms; the fear of them appearing can even discourage you from going through with the process.

While it’s possible to gradually reduce your dosage until you can safely stop taking Clorazepate, pharmacological treatment for withdrawal may be a more effective approach. During medical detox, physicians could prescribe certain medications to help relieve symptoms of withdrawal.

One such medication is flumazenil. This drug acts by blocking the effects of benzos and can also help you cope with withdrawal symptoms, as it attaches to the same pleasure centres in the brain targeted by benzodiazepines. While flumazenil is mainly used in the treatment of benzodiazepine overdose, it’s also successfully reduced the withdrawal symptoms caused by the presence of long-acting benzos in the body.

Live a Drug-free Life Again

It’s easy to think that you’ll never find happiness in recovery, because of how intense and painful withdrawal can be. However, every step of treatment requires you to fully trust in the process. Professional treatment centres provide you with quality care and an experienced team of medical experts, who do their level best to keep you comfortable throughout the process.

Withdrawal symptoms can be scary for most people, but if you want to achieve abstinence, it is a necessary part of the process. Medically supervised withdrawal and detox can help you smoothly transition from active addiction to recovery. You don’t have to remain dependent on Clorazepate or undergo detox alone.

There’s no better time than now to find the help you need to get back on your feet. Even if you’ve been abusing drugs for long periods, you can live an abstinent life again via life-changing, lifesaving treatment. The help you need is only one call away, and you can begin treatment at a centre that fully ensures you’re well cared for.

Preventing relapse

A relapse (following addiction treatment) doesn’t indicate that the treatment programme was ineffective or that you need to begin a new one. If you relapse during recovery, you may simply need to take certain steps to reduce its duration and severity. In addition, to prevent another relapse, a different treatment method could be considered. It also helps to recognise that stress is a common trigger for relapse, so you can learn how to identify and control potential stressful situations and keep your moods regulated.

Some helpful tips for preventing relapse include:

  • Eating a balanced diet, high in protein and complex carbohydrates and low in refined sugar
  • Exercising regularly and getting enough sleep
  • Joining a support group and participating regularly in meetings
  • Attending all therapy and counselling sessions
  • Taking all prescribed medications or supplements regularly and only as directed
  • Surrounding yourself with positive and supportive people
  • Avoiding places or people related to your previous drug use
  • Being self-reliant and trying not to expect too much from others

Tips for Handling Cravings

Cravings are h3 urges to consume drugs that are common when attempting to quit. They can last for months (and in some cases, years) after quitting. While cravings can be uncomfortable, they are a normal part of your recovery. It helps to remember that cravings are bearable and will pass in time, as they don’t last forever.

Whilst in recovery, you could experience intermittent cravings of various intensities. Handling cravings involve having realistic expectations about what they entail. Having an idea of what your triggers are and the people, places or feelings that cause your cravings, can help you avoid them.

You can also handle your cravings by reaching out for support, especially in early recovery. This gives you the opportunity to talk about your struggles and learn effective methods of coping. In addition, a healthy distraction can delay time, until your h3 urges fade away. Healthy distractions may include taking long walks, exercising, reading, playing sports or listening to music.

Find a treatment centre

It takes time and effort to find the right treatment centre or rehabilitation programme for your specific personal needs. No matter your level of addiction, you can break free with the right kind of help. It is therefore essential to take your time and search thoroughly, so you find the programme that will help you reach your goal of abstinence.

There are many different types of treatment centres, including inpatient rehab, outpatient treatment, intensive inpatient or outpatient hospitalisation. An inpatient treatment centre may be the best option if you or someone you love is struggling with Clorazepate addiction.

Inpatient or residential drug treatment facilities can provide intensive therapy and the tools you need to overcome drug addiction. You can get back on the right path and live the fulfilling, happy and successful life you desire.

Tips for Handling Cravings

Cravings are h3 urges to consume drugs that are common when attempting to quit. They can last for months (and in some cases, years) after quitting. While cravings can be uncomfortable, they are a normal part of your recovery. It helps to remember that cravings are bearable and will pass in time, as they don’t last forever.

Whilst in recovery, you could experience intermittent cravings of various intensities. Handling cravings involve having realistic expectations about what they entail. Having an idea of what your triggers are and the people, places or feelings that cause your cravings, can help you avoid them.

You can also handle your cravings by reaching out for support, especially in early recovery. This gives you the opportunity to talk about your struggles and learn effective methods of coping. In addition, a healthy distraction can delay time, until your h3 urges fade away. Healthy distractions may include taking long walks, exercising, reading, playing sports or listening to music.

Find a treatment centre

It takes time and effort to find the right treatment centre or rehabilitation programme for your specific personal needs. No matter your level of addiction, you can break free with the right kind of help. It is therefore essential to take your time and search thoroughly, so you find the programme that will help you reach your goal of abstinence.

There are many different types of treatment centres, including inpatient rehab, outpatient treatment, intensive inpatient or outpatient hospitalisation. An inpatient treatment centre may be the best option if you or someone you love is struggling with Clorazepate addiction.

Inpatient or residential drug treatment facilities can provide intensive therapy and the tools you need to overcome drug addiction. You can get back on the right path and live the fulfilling, happy and successful life you desire.

What special precautions should I follow?

If you’ve used Clorazepate for a long period of time, you should have blood counts and liver function tests periodically. All normal precautions with impaired renal or hepatic functions should also be followed. In addition, if you experience a degree of depression with the anxiety you’re treating with Clorazepate, suicidal tendencies may be present. Therefore, only the smallest possible dose of Clorazepate should be applied.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Clorazepate should be taken as recommended by your doctor. Take with or without food (with food is preferable if you experience a stomach upset). Don’t take with alcohol to avoid dangerous effects.

How Long Does Clorazepate Withdrawal Last?

Clorazepate withdrawal does not follow a specific timeframe, as it differs from one person to the next. Therefore, the length of time will depend on your level of addiction, your dosage and frequency of use.

Are There any Home Remedies for Getting Clean Safely?

If you’re trying to break free from an addiction to Clorazepate, home remedies are not the recommended way to do so. Medical detox offers a safer and more effective treatment to get you off Clorazepate long-term.

How Long Does it Take to Detox from Clorazepate?

Typically, Clorazepate takes from 24 hours to a couple of days to completely leave your system. Essentially, the timeline for detox depends on your history of Clorazepate usage.

Can You Die From Clorazepate Withdrawal?

There are various, severe Clorazepate withdrawal symptoms that can manifest. If unsupervised, many of these serious symptoms can become medical complications, which could prove fatal.

Can Medications Help?

During Clorazepate withdrawal and detox in a professional treatment centre, your doctor or caregiver can prescribe certain medications to reduce or prevent uncomfortable symptoms.

What Is Clorazepate Withdrawal?

Clorazepate withdrawal comprises the set of mild to severe physical and psychological symptoms that may be experienced when you suddenly stop using or significantly reduce your medication.

Is Clorazepate Withdrawal Dangerous?

Abruptly quitting Clorazepate can induce some dangerous symptoms. Also, it is potentially risky to undergo Clorazepate withdrawal on your own.

Are there ways to prevent or reduce withdrawal symptoms?

When going through withdrawal, it’s best to choose medical detox, as your physician can prescribe and administer the necessary medications to prevent or reduce unpleasant withdrawal symptoms.

Is Detox from Clorazepate dangerous?

Clorazepate is a highly potent benzodiazepine medication, which causes intense and sometimes deadly withdrawal symptoms during detoxification. The most dangerous way to detox from Clorazepate is to attempt to do so without medical supervision.

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