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Alcohol liver disease is all too common in those suffering from alcohol addiction and the only real way that successful treatment can be given is for the person to show a willingness to stop drinking and undergo a change in lifestyle. Both drug and behavioural treatments that are designed to help curb alcohol addiction have proven to be effective, as has nutritional therapy.

Alcoholics are generally malnourished due to a poor diet, loss of appetite and loss of liver function, which results in the body being unable to digest important nutrients. Malnourishment also makes the liver more open to the effects of alcohol. Nutritional therapy involves introducing a patient to a high-calorie diet that consists of high levels of protein and carbohydrates. This diet will be complemented with essential mineral and vitamin supplements.

In most circumstances, the patient will embrace nutrition therapy; however, serious cases of malnourishment may result in nutrients being administered via a tube inserted directly into the stomach.

Nutritional therapy for alcoholism can be sought from a GP, who will generally refer the patient to a dietician.

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