What is Meow Meow?

If you are the parent or a friend of a teenager or young person, this is a question that you may be wanting some answers to.

Legality

Meow Meow is the latest “designer” drug to hit the club scenes, and is growing in popularity with teenagers and the younger generation. Meow Meow, or M-Cat are two common street names for the chemical Mephedrone, which is used as a stimulant drug.  Originally Mephedrone was sold as a plant fertiliser and so was not medically regulated or governed under the Misuse of Drugs Act at the time.  The drug was therefore legal and led to a growing number of teenagers and young people taking it.  Despite the drug now being controlled and classified as a Class B drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act (which means it is now illegal to supply or possess) the popularity of this drug continues to grow.

Reasons for its popularity

The reason for Meow Meows apparent popularity is that it is readily available and cheap to buy, it is a very powerful stimulant with an effect that is similar to that of speed and ecstasy.  It usually comes in tablet form that can be swallowed or crushed and snorted and is very addictive due to the unpleasant come down effects.

Treatment

Addiction to Mephedrone can be treated much the same as any other addiction, there are a number of treatment options available that we can advise on.  Just because the drug used to be legal, does not mean it is safe to take.  Side effects can cause agitation, teeth grinding, nervousness, panic and anxiety, insomnia, loss of appetite, heart palpitations, arrhythmia, sweating, hallucinations, paranoia and even death.

As a Drugs and Alcohol treatment Counsellor for Addiction Helper, I am receiving more and more calls from worried parents and friends of individuals with Mephedrone Meow Meow addiction.  The long term effects of this drug are not yet known and my personal feeling is that its use will continue to grow until the next “designer” or “legal” drug undercuts it on the market.  Parents have every right to be concerned if they find out their teen is taking this drug.  I feel an early intervention can stop a problem from spiralling out of control, and that it should be considered just as harmful and destructive as any other drug that is misused.