jodie2Jodie Marsh, reality star, glamour model and champion bodybuilder has revealed how she once slept around as she hit rock bottom after being bullied. There heavily tattooed star talks about her experiences in the new television show “Bullied,” which airs tonight at 10 PM on Channel 5.

Jodie has become an advocate for victims of bullying everywhere, after revealing that she was bullied at school. Indeed, the bullying hasn’t stopped there-the media have at times, been relentless in picking on the Essex girl who first shot to fame on a reality show in 2002.Love her or hate her, Jodie has been working hard for years with anti-bullying charities and often offers words of encouragement to  victims of bullying via Twitter.

Sexual promiscuity and even sex addiction can be one of their terrible effects that bullying has. Far from being someone who loves sex,  a person  who has very low self-esteem may start to sleep around as they look for validation and attention in all the wrong places. Apart from the obvious dangers of having sex with someone you might not know very well, having sex to boost your self-esteem can become a vicious cycle. Often alcohol will be involved, which can lead to sleeping with someone you wouldn’t if you were sober and indulging in unprotected sex, or sexual activities that you wouldn’t normally consider if you haven’t had a drink.

At the heart of this lies fear of rejection, which comes, often, from being bullied in the past. For people who have never been picked on, they may find it inconceivable that bullying at school can have consequences that may last a lifetime. Sexual promiscuity is a classic example of this. Far from being an attention seeking “slapper,” someone who sexually promiscuous may not even like sex that much but will do it is not to be alone for attention. They may feel that if someone is willing to go to bed with them then they can’t be as ugly and disgusting as the police once told them. So how does someone break from this destructive cycle of behaviour? Counselling and therapy can be helpful as sex  or love addiction usually stems from events in childhood or early adolescence. The reasons behind destructive behaviours such as sexual promiscuity must be addressed in order to help raise the sufferer’s self-esteem and feelings of self worth. Like any destructive pattern of behaviour, sexual promiscuity can be difficult to beat, but it with the right help, it can be. You should focus on recovery and self-development instead of on the past.

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