Only half of drivers feel prescription drug labelling is clear enough on medicines, according to the latest poll by road safety charity the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM).

f05d7_2100_hl_painkillers_0703Earlier this year, the government announced that a drug-driving bill will be introduced and will include chemicals which can be found in prescription drugs. Almost a third of respondents suggest that a simple traffic-light system would be the best method to inform people of the risks of prescription drugs when driving.

It is clear that the vast majority of drivers have no sympathy for those who drive under the influence of drugs. Seventy-three per cent of drivers think that those who drive whilst under the influence of illegal drugs are as dangerous as drunk drivers. Eighty per cent of respondents agree with the view that a zero limit should be set for the worst illegal drugs.

Motorists feel that penalties are not harsh enough for drug-drivers. Currently, if prosecuted, they face a one year ban and up to £1000 fine. Fifty-nine per cent of respondents feel that this is not strong enough.

IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “Motorists clearly feel that labelling is not clear or consistent enough when giving information on driving when taking medications. A traffic-light system such as red for no driving, amber for care required and green for limited effects appears to be the most popular option. What is clear is that we will need a wide ranging information campaign to support the new laws and ensure motorists don’t find themselves on the wrong side of the law.”

Courtesy of Press Association 

If you are suffering from an addiction or are worried about a friend contact us today on freephone 0800 44 88 688 or text HELP to 66777.

You can contact us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AddictHelper or on Twitter at @addicthelper. Stay informed about all addiction discussion topics, because they will show you the current state of the war against drugs and other addictions.

The following two tabs change content below.