Putting Recovery First?

Addiction, including ones related to alcohol abuse, has a huge impact on a person and those around them. It affects relationships, careers and finances to name a few. And yet the NHS is still failing to provide adequate support for those individuals whose lives are being torn apart. Countless research has shown that the most effective form of treatment with successful outcomes is to enter a residential rehab clinic, yet to obtain such help within the NHS is almost impossible.

In December 2010 the Government published its new Drug Strategy, “Reducing Demand, Restricting Supply, Building Recovery: Supporting People to Live a Drug Free Life”, which aimed to set out a fundamentally different approach to tackling drugs and the considerable harms they cause to society. Part of this new Drug Strategy involves a new recovery orientated body being established that aims to help people overcome their dependence for good: Public Health England (PHE). Yet it needs to be asked, is this new body going to make a difference? Are they finally going to take the taxes they earn from the sale of alcohol and channel it towards setting up NHS rehab clinics? Unlikely.

Therefore, it is down to organisations such as AA to pick up the slack. When the funds are not available for a private rehab centre, and the NHS are not offering effective support, AA is free and immediate help for alcohol addiction. Another advantage is that AA is run by people that have been through it and are in recovery themselves , they do not judge and they are designed to offer a confidential service.

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